Tinkering: Kids Learn by Making Stuff by Curt Gabrielson

By Curt Gabrielson

After-school and out-of-school programs--as good as domestic schooling--have been growing to be gradually for almost a decade, yet teachers are nonetheless trying to find high-interest content material that ties into technological know-how criteria with out the pressure of present lecture room canon. the writer attracts on greater than two decades of expertise doing hands-on technology to facilitate tinkering: studying technology whereas being silly with actual issues. up-to-date with new pictures and in complete colour, this re-creation is much more available to younger makers or young-at-heart makers.

In this ebook, you are going to learn:

  • Tinkering innovations in key technology areas
  • How to allow youngsters research technology with hands-on tinkering
  • Engaging thoughts for technological know-how studying at domestic, at school, or at a makerspace or library
  • Step-by-step directions for actions that do not finish with a unmarried venture, yet that supply many paths for "tinkering forward".

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Tinkering: Kids Learn by Making Stuff

After-school and out-of-school programs--as good as domestic schooling--have been transforming into progressively for almost a decade, yet teachers are nonetheless looking for high-interest content material that ties into technological know-how criteria with no the tension of present school room canon. the writer attracts on greater than twenty years of expertise doing hands-on technological know-how to facilitate tinkering: studying technological know-how whereas being silly with genuine issues.

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The sand makes spikes along the lines of the magnetic field. You may be able to collect magnetic sand by dragging a large magnet through a sandy place. If the sand near you has no magnetite, you can also scrape the black dust off of old VHS tapes and use that. First pull the tape so that it stretches and loosens the dust, and then scrape it off (Figure 3-9). This will take a while, so you may also want to visit a local metal shop and sweep their floor for them. Figure 3-9. DIY magnetic sand Figure 3-7.

The reason is clear: magnets give force across a distance without contact. Normally, this is the realm of science fiction, but here it is happening in the palm of your hand1. In fact, after giving many magnet lessons over the years, I’ve come to believe that it’s sacrilegious, or at the very least criminal, to introduce the principles of magnetism without having students tinker around with some magnets first. The old adage applies with particular severity: if you tell someone something, you’ve forever robbed from them the opportunity to discover it for themselves.

Figure 3-9. DIY magnetic sand Figure 3-7. Just an ordinary electromagnet You can also tinker with magnetism using small uniform bits of steel, such as staples (already stapled or not), paper clips (Figure 3-10), or nails. Figure 3-8. The Exploratorium’s magnetic sand Figure 3-10. ” The magnetism we commonly talk about, that only works on iron, cobalt, and nickel, is called ferromagnetism. It turns out there are two other types—diamagnetism and paramagnetism—and that many things can be pushed on with very strong magnets due to their diamagnetic properties.

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